Luck

1Fasten your seat belts and get ready for hardcore stunts and thrills, Hollywood ishtyle. Come to think of it, Bollywood hasn’t churned out stylised action movies as regularly as it churns out comedies and rom-coms. There’s a vacuum for sure. But LUCK fills that lacuna. Be rest assured, you haven’t watched such thrills since DHOOM 2.

LUCK is more of a hi-concept film. Three decades ago, Krishna Shah’s SHALIMAR narrated the adventures of a billionaire who assembles/invites criminals/gangsters from across the globe to perform the heist of a precious diamond that he possesses. The concept isn’t similar here, but in this case too, a gambler assembles people from across the globe for a concept called human betting.


LUCK may not be high on story, but the concept and at least four stylised thrilling sequences make a big difference. Simply put, it makes LUCK lucky.

LUCK may have loads of thrills, but director Soham Shah ensures that the grand canvas and stylised thrills appeal to every strata of movie-going audience. Only thing, had screenplay writers Soham Shah and Rensil D’Silva worked doubly hard to come up with a watertight script, it would’ve only worked wonders.

After weighing the pros and cons, it can be said that LUCK rides on star power, its concept and adrenaline-pumping thrills primarily. If you’re into thrillers or have been missing one, LUCK holds the key.

LUCK tells the tale of mafia kingpin Musa [Sanjay Dutt], who has one obsession: To revolutionize the betting industry. For him, life is a gamble and what better way to skew the odds than play with those with luck on their side.

Different characters from different parts of the world, each with Lady Luck in their favour, are brought in to play the game of death. With millions at stake, how far will each of them go in courting danger and deceit?

The very start of the film transports you to a different world. The viewer is drawn into a world where bets are placed on humans and death-defying stunts are the order of the day. The train sequence at the very start says it all. It’s a sequence that not only introduces you to the plot, but also makes a hammer-strong impact. You haven’t watched something like this on the Hindi screen before.

The game of death is far more dangerous than those witnessed in the reality shows. The revolver sequence [the first challenge], the helicopter jump, the underwater sequence with sharks and the train sequence in the climax give you goose bumps and remain etched in your memory. There’s a scene involving a lighter too, which is sure to draw whistles and claps.

But the film slips due its ineffectual writing. It gyrates from engrossing to bas-theek-hain towards the second hour. The romantic track, to be specific, is flaccid. Also, the climax should’ve concluded the moment Imran wins the jackpot money of Rs. 20 crores. Wasn’t that his motive when he entered the game with his eyes wide open? So why this sudden urge to confront Sanjay Dutt after the game is over? Had the prize money doubled to Rs. 40 crores, it would’ve made sense. Or, for that matter, if he had a personal score to settle with Sanju, the game of death would’ve looked plausible. There’s no motive in the first place.

Moreover, the sequence in the hospital, towards the end, may be true, medically speaking, but the question is, was it necessary in a film of this genre? Frankly, it robs the film of its seriousness and even compels you to break in a full-throated roar, a reaction that is completely unwarranted. Even Shruti Haasan’s double role doesn’t cut ice.

Soham Shah has made a stylish film and the fact remains that he has an eye for visuals. But Soham should’ve stuck to the spirit of the film, instead of getting into diversions [romance and the penultimate scene]. Salim-Sulaiman’s music is vibrant and ‘Aasma’ is easily the pick of the lot. The background score [Amar Mohile] is electrifying. Santosh Thundiyil’s cinematography matches international standards. Ditto for the sound design by Dwarak Warrier. Allan Amin’s stunts and thrills are a major USP.

Sanju is perfect for this part and enacts it with natural ease. Actually, here’s one role that only he could’ve portrayed so effectively. Imran is getting better with every film. Watch his helplessness at the start or his confidence when he takes to the stunts. Even towards the latter reels, he’s very much in sync with his character.

Shruti Haasan is a star, no two opinions on that. The confidence with which she carries off this role just cannot be overlooked. Ravi Kishan is another scene-stealer. You are under the impression that he may get lost in the crowd, but he stands tall. The masses will love him.

Mithun Chakraborty is controlled and delivers a truly fine performance. Danny Denzongpa is, as always, so perfect. Very few actors have that ability to stand out in a crowd. He’s one of them. Chitrashi is excellent. The sequence in the hospital is superb. Rati Agnihotri gets no scope.

On the whole, LUCK rides on star power, adrenaline-pumping thrills and a concept that’s novel for the Indian screens. Despite some loose ends, these three factors primarily would ensure a Lucky journey at the box-office.

3/5 Stars

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